At Bohemianmojo we like to celebrate magical connections to the past – what we like to call ‘smoke from the flames of history - as much as we feel our duty to cast a critical eye over current events and controversies be it in the environment or the world of food.  This week I’m going to reach back into my career as a journalist again to share what was probably one of the most awe-inspiring stories I have ever covered. On the face of it this is the tale of a man and one of his ancestors, but it truly represents a window into another world.

Read more ...

Inspired by seven year-old Matilda Jones, who found her very own Excalibur in a fabled Cornish lake (see Part I) Bohemianmojo decided to unravel historical fact from the mountain of fiction surrounding the legend of King Arthur. The popular wisdom on the subject is that there are no historical facts to back the existence of a King Arthur; he’s just a very romantic but mythical figure. We beg to differ...

Read more ...

Always up for an adventure or a ramble down antiquity lane, I offered up a resounding “YES” when Alun asked if I’d be interested in wandering the downs in search of something called The Polissoir.  He explained it was a stone used for polishing and sharpening axes by Neolithic and Bronze Age people. This particular stone was situated somewhere on a part of the Wiltshire landscape called Fyfield Down, exact location unknown. We would get to walk along part of the Ridgeway and then search the designated field for the Polissoir.

Yes, yes, and more yes….so off we set.

Read more ...

For the past three weeks Bohemianmojo has been showcasing our series on King Arthur trying to answer the question; was he a real person or a fable? We believe he was a real, historical figure and to back up our case we’ve presented Bardic poems, the manuscripts of monastic scholars and archaeological facts. Along the way we’ve explained some of the historical context of Arthur’s time and the full-on warfare that consumed the lives of the people of the British Isles during the Dark Ages of the 5th and 6th Centuries AD.

Read more ...
Page 2 of 2