The term “heirloom” typically applies to fruits and vegetables. Heirloom is defined as “a horticultural variety that has survived for several generations usually due to the efforts of private individuals”. Heirlooms are hardy (quality) strains of older cultivars that are open pollinated. While there seems to be some disagreement how old a cultivar has to be to be referred to as “heirloom”, there is a general consensus that it should be older than the 1950’s which is when agribusiness began introducing the first inbred hybrid plants and seeds.

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It seems appropriate to start the year off with a conversation about one of the biggest food concerns on the proverbial table.The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) has been in the works since last year with discussions occurring under the radar and away from any chance for an open forum of thoughts and ideas.While the TTIP agreement has many facets, the one that is of most concern to Bohemian Mojo (and hopefully to every individual) is the call for a “regulatory convergence” where food production is concerned. If this agreement goes through unchallenged it will be potentially devastating to sustainable and heritage food all across the EU and US.

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The Problem of Packaging - Try this simple packaging test. Go to your local farmers market, buy some vegetables then watch the trader pop them into a brown paper bag. There’s something reassuring about seeing it flipped over to seal the pack with a twist.

Next stroll into your nearest supermarket and try to buy anything, really anything, that isn’t pre-wrapped in plastic. Even the bags provided for the limited selection of un-pre-packed veg will be a form of plastic.

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There's a whole new meaning to tempting your tastebuds. Do not be fooled if someone tells you that flavor is flavor is flavor and all like foods taste the same. This actually couldn’t be further from the truth. Sure, an apple is going to have many similarities to all the other apples; that’s what makes them apples.

However, once you start narrowing down actual flavor characteristics and “notes”, believe me, a Fuji apple from New Zealand tastes very different from a Fuji apple grown in Washington. The difference comes from a little thing called Terroir (pronounced tear waaahr).

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A perfect storm of sweet, savory, nutty, pungent, salty, all combined in an unassuming little piece of cheese. Gruyere is a PDO cheese from Switzerland. 

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Dark Chocolate, sea salt, ooey gooey caramel innards, locally produced, small batch...I never miss a chance to get my hands on a Welsh NomNom bar when the opportunity arises.So, imagine my absolute delight when the opportunity arose as I wandered through the Hey Deli in Hay on Wye, Wales. Now imagine, if at all possible, and even larger delight as I perused the label of my delicious, small batch, NomNom chocolate bar and found a PDO designation on the Anglesey sea salt! Hooray Halen Mon Anglesey Sea Salt!

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